Valley Breeze

The Valley Breeze & Observer 06-07-2018

The Valley Breeze Newspapers serving the Northern Rhode Island towns of Cumberland, Lincoln, Woonsocket, Smithfield, North Smithfield, Pawtucket, North Providence, Scituate, Foster, and Glocester

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2 AT HOME JUNE 6-12, 2018 | VALLEY BREEZE & OBSERVER LIVING EDITION Defiance of authority is self-destructive Rates of child and teen depression and suicide continue to rise, as they have for 50 years. As regular readers of this column know, I do not agree in the least with current explanations, much less the "treatments" based on them, proposed by the mainstream in the mental health professions. For the past year, on my weekly radio pro- gram "American Family Radio" I have challenged anyone in the mental health field to provide irrefutable evi- dence that the concept of a so-called "biochemical imbalance" is provable. Crickets. Same with my ongoing challenge to the efficacy of current treatment approaches, including expensive drugs that don't reliably outperform placebos (but, unlike pla- cebos, involve the risk of dangerous side-effects). The question, then, becomes: If I don't think that child and teen depression is becoming epidemic because of genes, biochemical imbal- ances, and "brain differences," what is my explanation? Do I have one or am I merely a contrarian? Yes and no. My non-materialistic explanation is quite simple: The rise of child and teen depression since the 1960s is the inevitable corollary of a corresponding decline in respect for parents and other adult authority figures – one's elders in general – that began developing among America's youth during that very deconstructive decade. It must be noted, with empha- sis, that whether children develop respect for their parents and adult authority in general is entirely – as in 100 percent – up to adults. I am proposing, therefore, that respect for authority among America's youth has eroded because where children are concerned, many if not most adults no longer possess respect for their own authority. As a grandmother once asked me, "How is it that my 30-something-year-old daughter has no problem telling adults who work under her what to do but takes orders from my 7-year-old grandson?" Children need to respect adults, beginning with their parents. That requires adults who recognize that need and step unabashedly up to the plate when it comes to the attendant responsibility. Adult authority anchors a child's sense of well-being in a world that is otherwise fraught with danger on every side. Adult authority is the antidote to unpredictability. Its meta-message is, "You have nothing to worry about because I am taking care of essential business in your life until you can take care of it for your- self." The problem began when, in the 1960s, progressives began demon- izing all forms of traditional authority – in the military, church, workplace, Traditional Parenting JOHN ROSEMOND See PARENTING, Page 5

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