Valley Breeze

The Valley Breeze Cumberland Lincoln 04-01-2021

The Valley Breeze Newspapers serving the Northern Rhode Island towns of Cumberland, Lincoln, Woonsocket, Smithfield, North Smithfield, Pawtucket, North Providence, Scituate, Foster, and Glocester

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12 THE VALLEY APRIL 1-7, 2021 | VALLEY BREEZE | CUMBERLAND LINCOLN EDITION Heritage Corridor's Combs honored for protecting water resources BLACKSTONE – When Bonnie Combs, of Blackstone, first started volunteering with the Blackstone River Watershed Council in 2005, she describes the experience as an "aha! moment." "I found my people," she told The Valley Breeze. "That just set the course for me to keep volunteering. My activ- ism grew from there." As a result of her activism, Combs, now marketing director for the Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor, has been awarded the 2020-21 Paul Keough Award from the New England Water Environment Association, which honors her "signifi- cant outreach, education, and advo- cacy work to protect our region's water resources." NEWEA's Paul Keough Award, established in 1994 in memory of Environmental Protection Agency employee Paul Keough, honors profes- sionals who have demonstrated their commitment to outreach and commu- nication to the public about the neces- sity of protecting the water environ- ment, states a press release. "I was very flattered and honored," said Combs about learning she had received the award. At BHC, Combs launched the Trash Responsibly Program to create awareness about the impact of lit- ter on natural resources, coordinated environmental cleanup events with 25 communities, and had the month of May declared Storm Drain Awareness Month by way of gubernatorial proc- lamation in Massachusetts and Rhode Island, Jordan Gosselin, spokesperson for NEWEA, told The Breeze. Combs also "delivered a passionate keynote address" at NEWEA's 2019 teacher training, which provides K-12 teachers with resources and workshops that can be implemented in their class- rooms to teach students about water environment issues. Also in 2019, Combs said, BHC received an Earth Day grant from the Narragansett Bay Commission to purchase storm drain marking sup- plies. Years ago, she said, she picked up a children's activity book, "Dwayne the Storm Drain," at a Blackstone River Watershed Association event, which talked about how litter can get into waterways. The book, she said, sparked her interest, and she began doing outreach to raise awareness about storm drains. "NEWEA is pleased to present Bonnie with this award in celebration of her decades of vital work to protect New England's precious water resourc- es," Gosselin said. NEWEA's awards program annually presents awards honoring members for outstanding water industry work in a variety of categories, including safety, engineering, operations, public education, public relations, manage- ment, collection systems, laboratory expertise, and service to the organiza- tion, and recognizes awards given by the Water Environment Federation and EPA Region One, states a press release. "We could not be more proud of Bonnie's accomplish- ment," Devon Kurtz, executive director of BHC, told The Breeze. "She is truly an amaz- ing advocate for the health of the Blackstone River Valley. The road to success is 'littered' with obstacles. While others might give up and turn around, Bonnie has consis- tently pushed her way through, clean- ing her way through the Valley. I can only imagine what she will do next." Combs said that her advice to the community is that any little bit helps. People don't need to take part in a big cleanup; they can simply pick up litter they see when walking down the street before it gets swept away by rain into a storm drain and then into a body of water. "My motto is to leave something better than I found it," Combs said. "Water is a precious resource. We can all do our part to protect it." By MELANIE THIBEAULT Valley Breeze Staff Writer melanie@valleybreeze.com 'My motto is to leave something better than I found it' COMBS Register for April vacation programs at OCYL CUMBERLAND – The Mayor's Office of Children, Youth and Learning, 1464 Diamond Hill Road, Suite 2, is now taking reg- istrations for April vacation week, April 19-23, for programs for kids in grades 3-6 in the STEAMshop. A stop-motion animation program will run from 9 to 11 a.m. Learning a variety of techniques such as object animation, pixelation and Claymation, students will write, design, direct and maybe even star in their own film. From 12 to 4 p.m., an arts pro- gram will offer students three differ- ent creative arts experiences each day, starting with percussion instru- ment experiences, then upcycle design and building projects, fol- lowed by visual art explorations. For students who register for both programs, a supervised lunch and recreation time will also be offered for a small fee. OCYL has implemented COVID- 19 prevention protocols for in-per- son programs. Register at www.ocyl.org . For more information, call 401-475- 0929 or email main.ocyl@gmail. com . FROM THE CAFE FRIED OYSTER APPETIZER ................................................................................................. $18 LOBSTER RANGOON Served with sweet and sour sauce .............................................................. $13 FRIED FISH SANDWICH Served with french fries ............................................................. $10 JUMBO BOWL OF STEAMERS 2 lbs. of Maine steamers served with onions, corn, and linguica ..... $18 PAN SEARED SALMON OR SWORDFISH Topped with garlic butter & served with potato & veg ....$18 SHRIMP SCAMPI Sautéed with tomatoes and spinach in a garlic butter sauce over pasta ...................... $18 CLAM STRIP PLATE ....................................................................................................................................... $15 JUMBO LOBSTER SALAD ROLL Fresh lobster salad on a toasted brioche with lettuce and tomato served with fries ................................................................................................. $26 FRIED WHOLE BELLY CLAM PLATE served with French fries and cole slaw ....................... $24 463 East Washington St., North Attleboro, MA 508-695-7087 • www.FreshCatchNorth.com Take Out Hours: Monday Closed; Tuesday - Thursday 12-7 p.m. Friday 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; Saturday 11 a.m.-6:30 p.m.; Sunday 12-4 p.m. DESSERTS TO GO -$5 EACH Prices Valid 3/30 - 4/6/2021 NOW OPEN FOR DINE-IN Lemoncello Cream Cake • Chocolate Cake • Vanilla Cream Brulee - Gluten Free Now SelliNg Zuppardi'S FroZeN piZZa iN the retail! FRESH SEAFOOD SPECIALS Fresh Canadian Salmon Fillets ........ $12.99 Lb. Raw Lobster Tails in the Shell ........... $8.99 Ea. Oven Ready Jumbo Stuffed Shrimp ........ $2.49 Ea. Large Cooked Shrimp ....................... $13.99 Lb. Now carrying new line of seafood Pates from Boston smoked seafood company FROM THE CAFE FROM THE MEAT DEPARTMENT Boneless Budda Ball Hams ............................................ $4.99 lb. Domestic Rack of lamb .................................................$14.99 lb. USDA Choice Tomahawk Steaks ................................ $13.99 lb. Celebrating 40 Years of Feeding the Neighborhood 1980 - 2020 Don't forget your Holiday Appetizer Scallops & Bacon , Seafood Stuffed Mushrooms , Shrimp Cocktail and much more We are closed Easter Sunday so the staff can enjoy the day with their families Don't forget your Holiday Appetizer • Scallops & Bacon • Seafood Stuffed • Mushrooms • Shrimp Cocktail and much more!

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