Valley Breeze

The Valley Breeze & Observer 04-23-2020

The Valley Breeze Newspapers serving the Northern Rhode Island towns of Cumberland, Lincoln, Woonsocket, Smithfield, North Smithfield, Pawtucket, North Providence, Scituate, Foster, and Glocester

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VALLEY BREEZE & OBSERVER LIVING EDITION | APRIL 22-28, 2020 AT HOME / ENTERTAINMENT 14 Bringing back mom's go-to recipe CUMBERLAND — Regina Carter is a gal whose parents immi- grated to this country in 1953 from Germany. She and another sibling were born in the United States, but her eldest three siblings were born in Germany. "My parents both worked really hard, and with five children, we struggled to make it barely up to middle class level," Regina shared. Since she was the youngest, she realizes now that she had it a little bit easier. "The others had moved out and there was more money (for me to have things)." She was able to travel back to Germany several times with her mother and meet her cousins and extended family. She learned to appreciate the cultural traditions, the language and foods. Regina reached out to me and sug- gested we "bring back the recipes our foremothers cooked in hard times," such as this week's recipe for Liver Dumpling Soup that her mom used to make. Regina said, "Mothers knew the cost of food down to the penny." I know coming from a family with five children and one paycheck, my own mother knew how to stretch a dollar. We ate a lot of casseroles that included ground beef – which back then was 99 cents per pound – and pasta. My mother even went so far as to create her own "faux" ham salad using canned Spam as the fake ham. I'm not a fan of any meat you have to scrape the gel off before eating, but I'll admit the fancy metal key attached to the can (used to open the oval tin) intrigued me. One of the lessons I am taking from the coronavirus health crisis is that we should be more aware of waste. Once it became a challenge to find some basic food staples and paper goods, I began to appreciate more what I do have and I am more thoughtful than ever in the planning of a meal. Make it once, eat it twice is my new mantra. Call it Yankee ingenuity, but these times do call for strategy and a little sense of humor helps, too. My cousin Vicki and her husband, Ron, live on an island in Hawaii. She shared with me via email what they did last week to keep morale up in their neighborhood. She said, "You know Ron has made fabulous pizza for decades. He grew up in the Bronx, N.Y., and pizza is his holy grail." So the couple decided on a pizza night – but not a typical pizza night. On their island, only 40 people have tested positive (at the time of this writing) and that's not a huge number but they are adhering to all the safety regulations. So Ron and Vicki created their own pizza logo, a graphic artist friend put it on red shirts, and they sent out an invite to some friends. Said Ron, "I scrupulously cleaned the kitchen beforehand and was as sanitary as could be during the pro- cess. I gave the pies to folks while wearing a bandana and dishwashing gloves. We slid each pie from our pan to the recipients' pan." The way it worked, Ron and Vicki (aka Angela and Tony) began to crank out pizzas, fresh and hot from this non-existent pizza company. Once one was ready a friend was called to the "counter," actually their front porch, for the gloved-up, masked-up, drive-thru delivery. Vicki worked the counter, calling about every 15 minutes for another friend or neighbor to come by and pick up their pie. She'd say in her best "Sopranos accent," "Aay, this is Angela from ****** Pizza. Ya pie just went in the oven so get your (butt) ova yeah!" They both wore red T-shirts bear- ing the name of the pizza company (a name I'm not allowed to put in print) and they had Tony and Angela name tags. When picking up the pizza, some of their friends wore costumes, one brought a mango cake, some brought gifts for Ron and Vicki, such as flowers, Girl Scout cookies, a beautiful plant, banana lumpia, sourdough bread and a lot of smiles. It was lots of work but Vicki was happy to have had all that company and she did not even have to clean the house beforehand. Afterward they were in her words, "pooped!" But it was a blast manag- ing a way to stay safe, yet connected to the people in their community. Perhaps ingenuity, planning and a sense of humor are a few ways to lighten the load of a very uncertain time in our world and still be con- nected with one another. Regina Carter had a great suggestion for our readers. If you have an economical recipe to share or perhaps a recipe from your childhood that your mom used to make submit it to: rhonda@valleybreeze. com . Keep it simple, keep it affordable, healthy and delicious. Now that's a challenge for you! The Recipe Box RHONDA HANSON Liver Dumpling Soup Regina Carter Ingredients: 1/2 lb. beef liver Lg. onion, finely chopped 2 tsp. butter 2 tsp. parsley 1/4 tsp. marjoram Pepper to taste 1 cup bread crumbs 2 eggs 10 cups water Beef bouillon to taste (3 big tea- spoons granulated) Directions: • In a large bowl combine chopped liver, butter, onions and one tea- spoon of parsley. • Add all other seasonings to the dumplings; mix with processor or hand mixer. Next, add bread crumbs and eggs. Let sit (it gets more firm). • Bring water, bullion and one teaspoon of parsley to a rapid boil. (Get a bowl of water to wet your hands while making the dumplings and keep next to your work.) • Begin making 1 & 1/2 inch globes in your palm and roll them into smooth, round, small dumplings. It should make about 8. • Drop into hot broth and gently boil for 20 minutes on medium. Serves 4. Serve with a salad. Enjoy. Note from Regina: The cost to make this meal is about $4. It provides protein, carbs, multivitamins. The film follows the travails of lowly senate aide to Dianne Feinstein who is tasked with inves- tigating the CIA's detention and interrogation pro- gram of detained Muslim prisoners after the 9/11 attacks. This aide, Daniel Jones, is played by Adam Driver who everyone will recog- nize as bad guy Kylo Ren from the most recent Star Wars films. He starts out ini- tially with an equal team of Democratic and Republican staffers so that their work is considered unbiased, but as the politics of Washington D.C. begin to unfold, allegiances and alliances fall asunder and soon Dan is doing a lot of the legwork himself. Driver is certainly an interesting actor and he has easily made some of the most random casting decisions for himself in the last few years and I applaud that. This is a guy who will not be boxed into any sort of typecast. He easily adapts from comedy ("Logan Lucky") and to drama such as this or the more recent "Marriage Story." His character in the film changed his course selec- tions at Harvard post 9/11 much like Driver himself did in real life; enlisting and serving as a Marine for two years before being discharged due to an injury. Driver is excellent at playing the serious, straight man. He's the kind of actor that can deliver that stoic, deadpan mono- logue and leave you believing that a pig could fly since he is so stone-faced in his presentation. But this film isn't just Driver, although he carries a lot of the load and is easily the core central figure; there's a great cast behind him. Annette Bening is mesmerizingly spot on, especially visu- ally through some very specific and persuading makeup as Sen. Dianne Feinstein. She is portrayed as a tough woman to contend with, and on Capitol Hill that's no doubt necessary when most of her peers are power-hungry, self- preservationist men. Some of the other strong characters include former CIA director John Brennan (Ted Levine) and National Security Council head Denis McDonough ( Jon Hamm). While this film might not be as nail-bit- ing as other political genre films, it defi- nitely shows you the seedier, dirty side of what the CIA and NSA are capable of doing to protect the public. There's a little bit of righteousness at points in the film and it wants to lead you one way before leveling out. The film is rated R. 'THE REPORT' From Page 12 DRIVER answers Do you know someone celebrating a May Birthday? The Valley Breeze Birthday Club for MAY will be printed on April 30, 2020. Forms should be received by The Valley Breeze by Friday, April 24, 2020. Send in the name of someone with his or her May birth date and $2 per edition and we'll include them in the club. The check should be made payable to The Valley Breeze for use in the Breeze charities fund. Mail to: The Valley Breeze, 6 Blackstone Valley Place, Suite #204, Lincoln, RI 02865. Thank you! Greetings should be 10 words or less. Name: .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. Date of Birth: ............................................................................................................................................ Age: .............................................................................. From: ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Contact Phone Number (for questions, not publication) ................................................................................................................................................. Edition (please check): Cumberland/Lincoln edition ($2) Pawtucket edition ($2) Observer edition ($2) North Smithfield/Blackstone/Woonsocket edition ($2) North Providence edition ($2)

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