Valley Breeze

The Valley Breeze Cumberland Lincoln 11-14-2019

The Valley Breeze Newspapers serving the Northern Rhode Island towns of Cumberland, Lincoln, Woonsocket, Smithfield, North Smithfield, Pawtucket, North Providence, Scituate, Foster, and Glocester

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22 AT HOME / CALENDAR NOVEMBER 14-20, 2019 | VALLEY BREEZE LIVING EDITION Wednesday and Friday nights. Kitchen opens at 3:30 p.m. Bingo starts at 5 p.m. OPEN HOUSE – for parents, guardians and prospective students will be held at Blackstone Valley Regional Vocational Technical High School, 65 Pleasant St., Upton. The evening is an opportunity to tour the campus and gather information regard- ing the national recognized vocational tech- nical system. Parking will be available and shuttle service will be provided in the event of inclement weather. 5:30 p.m. CUMBERLAND/LINCOLN LIONS CLUB – will hold its monthly membership meeting at the Cumberland Public Library, 1464 Diamond Hill Road. Anyone interested in joining are welcome. For further informa- tion and directions to the meeting, contact Aaron Coutu at aaroncoutu@aol.com or 401-215-3279. 7 p.m. Thursday November 21 CHRIST CHURCH THRIFT SHOP – Open Thursdays and Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Departments include furniture, decorative accessories, small appliances, domestics, household items, seasonal clothing, boots, shoes, toys and holiday decorations. New items arrive weekly. 1643 Lonsdale Ave., Lincoln. Call 401-725-1920. MEDITATION GROUP – meets every Thursday at the Lincoln Senior Center, 150 Jenckes Hill Road, Lincoln. Call 401-753- 7000. 1 p.m. CHESS GAMES – at the Cumberland Public Library, 1464 Diamond Hill Road, every Thursday, 1-4 p.m. All welcome. Call Vic Blank at 401-263-3888 for information. CUMBERLAND LIBRARY FRIENDS BOOKSTORE – offers used books, sorted and categorized, for sale. Books are $1 or less. Book donations are also accepted. 1464 Diamond Hill Road, Cumberland. Call Nancy at 401-334-3268 with questions. 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. BINGO – at Lincoln Housing, 10 Franklin St., Lincoln. Doors open at 4:30 p.m. The kitchen will be open from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Bingo starts 6 p.m. HARLEM WIZARDS – come to the Cumberland High School Wellness Center, 2600 Mendon Road, hosted by the Community School Association. Tickets are $15 in advance, $20 at the door and $40 for a Court side Plus Package. This package includes court side seating, a 10-minute pregame meet and greet with two Wizards players and a Wizards poster. Tickets may be purchased through the Community School or at the door. 6:30 p.m. ARTISTS CIRCLE FOR ADULTS – held every Thursday at the Woonsocket Harris Public Library, 303 Clinton St., 7:15 p.m. A non-instructional gathering. Bring your own supplies or a project you are working on and meet with fellow artists and get inspired. Call the library at 401-769-9044 for more information. 7:15 p.m. Friday November 22 DISNEY'S "FROZEN JR." – presented at the Stadium Theatre, 28 Monument Square, Woonsocket. Friday at 7:30 p.m.; Saturday at 7:30 p.m.; and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets are $15 and are available at the Stadium Theatre Box Office or by calling 401-762- 4545 and online at www.stadiumtheatre. com. BINGO – offered at The Forand Manor, 30 Washington St., Central Falls, every Wednesday and Friday nights. Kitchen opens at 3:30 p.m. Bingo starts at 5 p.m. STEPHANIE MILLS – performs at the Twin River Event Center, 100 Twin River Road, Lincoln. For tickets, visit www.twinriver.com . 8 p.m. Saturday November 23 INDOOR YARD SALE – open every Saturday, 8 a..m-1 p.m. and Sunday, 10 a.m-1 p.m., at the Woonsocket Cat Sanctuary, 266 Mendon Road, Woonsocket. New items every week. All proceeds benefit the cat sanctuary. Call 401-765-4174. TRASH OR TREASURE SHOP – of the Church of the Good Shepherd, 490 Broadway, Pawtucket, has re-opened with fall/winter merchandise. New and gently- used clothing and shoes for the family is available along with handbags, books, home goods, soft domestics, etc. The shop is open every Wednesday and Saturday from 9 a.m.-noon. CUMBERLAND LIBRARY FRIENDS BOOKSTORE – Friends Bookstore at the Cumberland Public Library offers used books, sorted and categorized, for sale. Books are $1 or less. Book donations are also accepted. 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 1464 Diamond Hill Road, Cumberland. Call Nancy at 401-334-3268 with questions. WINTER FARMERS MARKET – at Hope Artiste Village, 999 Main St, Pawtucket. Features over 80 vendors selling their local- ly-grown products, featuring an extensive variety of local farmers, fishers, and food producers. Visit www.farmfresh.org . 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. CHRIST CHURCH THRIFT SHOP – Open Thursdays and Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Departments include furniture, decorative accessories, small appliances, domestics, household items, seasonal clothing, boots, shoes, toys and holiday decorations. New items arrive weekly. 1643 Lonsdale Ave., Lincoln. Call 401-725-1920. THE 2ND ANNUAL SHOP CHEPACHET: OFF THE BEATEN PATH – takes place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at nine studios and shops around Chepachet. For locations and more information, visit https://tinyurl.com/ y3v7h6h4 . VETERANS MEMORIAL MUSEUM – is open every Saturday and Tuesday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Also open for tours by appointment. The museum is located at 78 Earle St., Woonsocket. Call 401-222-9025. WIGGLE YOUR BUTT! – at the Audubon Powder Mill Ledges Wildlife Refuge, 12 Sanderson Road, Smithfield. So many ani- mals communicate with each other by wig- gling their behinds. Honeybees, wild turkey, deer, squirrels and even your cat and dog. Come get your sillies out and play some wiggly games, do wiggly dances and take a walk on the wildlife refuge communicating like local wildlife. Dress for both indoors and out. Fee: $5/member child; $7/non-member child. Ages: 3-6. Register through the events calendar at www.asri.org . 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. STONE SOUP COFFEEHOUSE – presents the Atwater-Donnelly Trio at the The Music Mansion, 88 Meeting St., Providence. Tickets are $20. For tickets, visit http:// stonesoupcoffeehouse.org . 7 p.m. "SEDUCTION OF THE INNOCENT" – Rhode Island Stage Ensemble's Daydream Theater production at the RISE Playhouse, 142 Clinton St., Woonsocket. Tickets are $15 at the door or at www.ristage.org. 8 p.m. QUARTETT GIOCOSA will present "Macabre" on Sunday, Nov. 17, 4 p.m., at The Black Box, 15 West Central St., Franklin, Mass., as part of The Black Box Classical Series. This Halloween-themed concert will feature Schubert's famous quartet "Death and the Maiden." Also on the program is Saint Saens' "Danse Macabre" and a few other creepy treats. Tea service by Franklin's Intermission Cafe will be available in the lobby. Quartett Giocosa is a professional classical quartet featuring violinists Heather Goodchild and Irina Fainkichen with Irina Naryshkova on viola and Elizabeth Schultze on cello. Visit www.theblackboxonline.com or call 508- 528-3370 for tickets and more information. Wednesday November 20 From page 21 lexia and ADD, which often leaves her quite disorganized. Hence, while cook- ing the blackberries, she realized she did not have cinnamon at-the-ready, so she then reached into the cupboard and added a pinch. "Immediately the color of the berries changed to splochy. What I'd thought was cinnamon was actually cumin!" she shared. What to do next? "I added a couple of bour- bon splashes to hopefully disguise the cumin. I had second and third thoughts to not submit the pie. But what the heck?" She had a free ticket for admission to the fair and decided to go, reluctantly entering her cheesecake. In the past, typically the pies and cheesecakes were judged that same day in the audience. However, she learned that rules had changed. Contestants were directed to drop off their entries and results would be found at a later date online. So she left having had no clue about her entry. "Over the next two weeks I checked for the results multiple times daily, but could not find any," said Virginia. She thought, no Cinderella story for me. (She had her "Cinderella" story with her winning Rhode Island Blueberry Pie in 2010 at the same annual fair, and did not really expect it to happen again.) On her next day off, she decided to go to the fair; after all, she had more free tickets. "Why not?" she asked herself. Feeling no chance of winning, she was OK with that. Upon entering the culinary building, the first thing she saw was the cheesecakes. "Hmmm, no winner for me," she thought. "I continued to the bread section, which was quite boring. My main objective was to see what was trending in culinary. After the breads, there was tower of cheesecakes. My cheesecake was presented front and center at eye level! The blue ribbon!" She described being so shaken she couldn't hold her camera still enough to take a picture of it! "My face, I'm sure was pulsating red," said Virginia. As people walked by, she told them, "That's my cheesecake, that's my cheesecake." The awards ceremony was held about two weeks later and her cheese- cake received the Judge's Award. "Honestly, I had no idea I was in con- tention for that award," she said. But for Virginia, going bold is her style. In fact, at the bottom of her email message a mantra says, "Never be afraid to be bold." She carries that through to her work as a nurse, in loving her family and in all the little details of life. CHEESECAKE From Page 5 The Valley Breeze proudly supports The Blackstone Valley Independent Business Alliance. Buy Local! Learn more at www.buylocalbv.org answers

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