Valley Breeze

The Valley Breeze & Observer 04-25-2019

The Valley Breeze Newspapers serving the Northern Rhode Island towns of Cumberland, Lincoln, Woonsocket, Smithfield, North Smithfield, Pawtucket, North Providence, Scituate, Foster, and Glocester

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VALLEY BREEZE & OBSERVER LIVING EDITION | APRIL 24-30, 2019 THE VALLEY / ENTERTAINMENT 5 nurses and being prepped for sur- gery. In addition to the Cuddle Bags, which cost about $7 each to put together, the team also assembles Hope Bags to donate to people at shelters, which include basic essen- tials such as a toothbrush, toothpaste, shampoo, conditioner, a bar of soap and a comb. "We're always looking for dona- tions," Antone said. "We've been really lucky. We've donated 300 bags already just from raising money from friends and family." Antone has also received dona- tions from people in California and Kentucky who happened to find the nonprofit's website and reached out to help, she said. To donate through PayPal or Amazon Wish List, visit www.cuddle- sofhope.org/help-us.html . Antone said all monetary donations are used to buy items for the bags. When donating through Amazon, you can purchase any number of stuffed animals that the company will ship to Antone. While at a friend's house last June, Lucas fell and injured his eye on the brake handle of a bike. After an ambulance ride to Hasbro Children's Hospital in Providence, the family was told that Lucas needed surgery to repair his eye and tear duct. Scared as he was being prepped for surgery, he cuddled a towel that was stained with his own blood, his mom said. "He kept saying he wanted his Pooh bear," she said. "He wouldn't let the towel go. It really broke my heart." Lucas' trip to the hospital was Antone's first emergency situation as a mother, which made her realize "how unpredictable life can be and how quickly things can change." Since that experience, Antone's family has come together to run the nonprofit. While Antone serves as president, her husband Nathan Antone, a Smithfield native who works security at Fidelity Investments, is vice president. Her father, Charles Gibney, of North Providence, serves as secretary for the organization, and her mother, Julie Gibney, also helps out a lot, she said. Lucas, now 3, who's doing great, his mom said, and his sister Zoey, 7, a 2nd-grader at Greystone Elementary School in North Providence, help their parents assem- ble the bags. "They love making the bags," Antone said. "They get very excited. They love dropping them off." Due to privacy reasons they don't get to see the kids who receive the bags, but Antone said she leaves a note from their new stuffed animal along with her email address. "I just hope it makes a little bit of a difference for them during a difficult time," she said. "That's really why I do it." She also hopes when the kids look at the stuffed animals later that they're reminded of their courage and strength, she said. Antone, who enjoys volunteering, said she always wanted to create her own nonprofit. In high school she volunteered for Special Olympics as a coach and with the Make-A- Wish Foundation and the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. "I always knew I wanted to start something of my own," she said. "This experience helped with that." For Easter, the team assembled baskets and gifts for 30 children at a women's shelter in Middletown. Antone's favorite part about the organization is "giving back to the community," she said. The community has also given a lot back to her. "A lot of friends within North Providence have been very support- ive," Antone said. "The community has helped out a lot." For more information, visit www. cuddlesofhope.org or contact Antone at amy.antone@cuddlesofhope.org . AMY ANTONE, of North Providence, and her children, ZOEY, 7, and LUCAS, 3, hold up stuffed animals that will be donated to children in hospitals and shelters around New England, as part of Antone's nonprofit Cuddles of Hope Foundation. CUDDLES From Page One Living History Encampment Weekend at Smith-Appleby House SMITHFIELD – Smith-Appleby House Museum, 220 Stillwater Road, will host a Living History Encampment Weekend on Saturday, April 27, and Sunday, April 28, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Experience a Civil War Encampment by D Battery 130th Battalion on Saturday and Sunday. Joining them on Sunday will be the United Training Artillery with a Revolutionary War Encampment. See camp life, cooking over a camp fire, colonial soldiers' campsites and a cannon fire. Tours of the museum will also be available. Visit www.smithappleby- house.org for more information. "Terminator." No matter the role, here as a dad in over his head and struggling with grief, his emotions come through and he gets you in the gut. Lithgow is also no slouch by any means. He has been turning in great work as a lead and a sup- porting actor going all the way back to one of my personal favorites, "The World According to Garp" with Robin Williams. Here he is creepy and unwelcome. He serves a good purpose and lends credence to the role. This updated version varies slight- ly from the last attempt. I guess what it all boils down to for me is one simple question, was it scary? The simple answer is yes. There were plenty of the familiar jump scares that audiences expect and want nowadays from these movies. The foreshadowing with the speed- ing semi-tractor trailers should have come as no surprise to anyone. For those unfamiliar with the story, you should be forewarned that bad things happen here, espe- cially in regards to children. But that, in and of itself, is a terror that any parent lives in fear of when it comes to their kids. Nowadays, in this technologically advanced world we live in, some parents get unhinged if their kids don't respond to a text after 10 minutes. I remem- ber going out in the afternoon and never coming home until sundown in my youth and my parents never worried. Of course, I also didn't grow up next to a mystical graveyard that brought things back from the dead and not quite as they originally were. The film is rated R. PET From Page 3 Creedence Revived performs at the Stadium Saturday WOONSOCKET – Creedence Revived pays tribute to Creedence Clearwater Revival at the Stadium Theatre, 28 Monument Square, on Saturday, April 27, at 8 p.m. Songs include "Have You Ever Seen The Rain," "Proud Mary," and "Bad Moon Rising." Admission is $26, $31, $36. Tickets are available at the Stadium Theatre Box Office or by calling 401-762-4545 and online at www. stadiumtheatre.com . Elise Vetri Keller Williams Leading Edge Cell: 401-651-1138 www.SilverPinesofri.com Elise Vetri Realtor www.EliseVetri.com SPRING INTO ACTION! Come on down and see what we have to offer at Silver Pines Condominums We have great deals on Town houses and One Level Condos OPEN SUNDAY, APRIL 28 1 p.m.-3 p.m. For GPS Use 32 Alpine Way, No. Smithfield, RI 02896 All units have a 2 Car Garage, Pet Friendly Community, Affordably Priced Low interest financing options available Call today for your private viewing and see what everyone is talking about!

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