Valley Breeze

The Valley Breeze & Observer 02-07-2019

The Valley Breeze Newspapers serving the Northern Rhode Island towns of Cumberland, Lincoln, Woonsocket, Smithfield, North Smithfield, Pawtucket, North Providence, Scituate, Foster, and Glocester

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2 ENTERTAINMENT / AT HOME FEBRUARY 6-12, 2019 | VALLEY BREEZE & OBSERVER LIVING EDITION have been increasingly hamstrung – by unsupportive administrators, politicians and the courts – when it comes to discipline. It's student behavior, folks, not class size. MYTH: More money would improve student achievement. FACT: As a category, Catholic schools have the best record when it comes to student achievement, including students who represent the lower end of the socioeconomic spectrum. With rare exception, Catholic schools spend consider- ably less per student than do public schools. Classroom discipline in most Catholic schools is head-and- shoulders above the ever-deteriorat- ing situation in most public schools, but equally important is the fact that Catholic schools do not suf- fer administrative bloat. Unlike the case in most public school districts, one does not find multiple assistant superintendents of this and that in Catholic systems. MYTH: Encouraging parents to oversee and help with homework positively impacts student achieve- ment. FACT: Wrong again. A 2014 study found an inverse relation- ship between homework help from parents and school achievement, irrelevant of any demographic char- acteristic or even child ability level. The fact is that homework enabling – a much more accurate descriptor than "homework help" – is like any other form of enabling: to wit, it has a decidedly negative impact on personal responsibility and, there- fore, a negative impact on student achievement. Referencing the 1950s again (which drives my perennial detractors up the proverbial wall), it was the rare parent who rendered anything more than occasional help with homework. Thus, children possessed higher levels of personal responsibility and student achieve- ment was significantly higher. MYTH: Social science research has been a boon to public education. FACT: Since the late 1960s, public school educators and policymak- ers have embraced the progressive notion that new ideas are better than old ideas. The new ideas in question have been supported by social science research (which will support just about anything one wants it to support), yet none of the new ideas – open classrooms, out- come-based education, collaborative learning (to cite but a few) – have panned out. Today as yesterday, the most successful schools are those that adhere to a traditional model. MYTH: Teaching academics prior to first grade (encouraged by both public and private schools) boosts overall achievement. FACT: A growing number of educators and researchers are con- vinced that teaching academics prior to 1st grade increases the per capita incidence of learning disabili- ties and lowers achievement in the long run. As did most of my peers, I came to 1st grade not knowing my ABCs. Lest I needlessly repeat myself, the reader is encouraged to re-read myths one through four above. Family psychologist John Rosemond: johnrosemond.com, parentguru.com. PARENTING From Page One PROVIDENCE – Jeanne Sullivan Evans and her mother Elaine Sullivan have been performing in cabarets and musicals side by side for at least 25 years. But this weekend, they will be joined on stage for the first time by Evans' son Marcus. "We're happy to include my baby bird," said Jeanne in a recent inter- view with all three generations. The trio are part of the ensemble of "Jekyll & Hyde: In Concert" at Academy Players on Friday and Saturday, Feb. 8 and 9. This is Academy's second show in the Musicals in Concert series. "I saw there were people around me who loved to sing but did not want the theater platform," said Rita Maron, artistic director at Academy. She audi- tioned dozens of performers. "I want- ed a company of people that didn't have to audition for every show," and she formed her Company Cast, producing "The Addams Family: In Concert" in the fall. "I was very happy with 'Addams Family' and so were the audiences," said Maron. "So, I feel there is a sup- ply and demand for these types of shows in Rhode Island." And on that came the decision to present "Jekyll & Hyde," the musical based on Robert Louis Stevenson's gothic novella, "The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde." While experimenting with human nature, Dr. Henry Jekyll taps into the evil side of his own personality and creates his monstrous alter ego, Edward Hyde. The Sullivan trio is enjoying this experience. "I was feeling quite inept after week two," says Jeanne. "Matt Cunningham is a brilliant music direc- tor, and Rita has set the bar high." But having seen the group's production of "The Addams Family," she knew that her hard work would pay off. "It's reminiscent of many musical endeavors to enhance credibility and experience in various musical genres," says Elaine, "to achieve the ultimate goal of musical excellence in perfor- mance." "I am always up for a good chal- lenge," says Marcus. This is his second show with Academy. He performed in "Newsies" in the early fall. "This was a great opportunity to grow as a musi- cian and singer so I couldn't be more thrilled." The cast rehearses just one night a week, so the Sullivans take the oppor- tunity to get together on off-nights to rehearse. "We go to Grandma's, eat her food and sing to her so she catches on," says Marcus, a junior at Coventry High School. "And I am definitely in charge." Next up for Marcus is "All Shook Up" with the Community Players in Pawtucket. Jeanne and Elaine may be performing in the Cavalcade of Bands in May. "Beyond that, I may like to try my hand at directing young people at Academy Players," says Jeanne. "I am so impressed with their outreach into the community. Kids thrive in that Three generations perform in 'Jekyll & Hyde: In Concert' By FRANK O'DONNELL Valley Breeze Entertainment Writer Three generations of the Sullivan family, from left, ELAINE SULLIVAN, MARCUS EVANS and JEANNE SULLIVAN EVANS will perform in the Academy Players pre- sentation of "Jekyll & Hyde: In Concert." See JEKYLL & HYDE, Page 6 Do you know someone celebrating a March Birthday? The Valley Breeze Birthday Club for MARCH will be printed on February 28, 2019. Forms should be received by The Valley Breeze by Friday, February 22, 2019. Send in the name of someone with his or her March birth date and $2 per edition and we'll include them in the club. The check should be made payable to The Valley Breeze for use in the Breeze charities fund. Mail to: The Valley Breeze, 6 Blackstone Valley Place, Suite #204, Lincoln, RI 02865. Thank you! Greetings should be 10 words or less. Name: .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. Date of Birth: ............................................................................................................................................ Age: .............................................................................. From: ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Contact Phone Number (for questions, not publication) ................................................................................................................................................. Edition (please check): Cumberland/Lincoln edition ($2) Pawtucket edition ($2) Observer edition ($2) North Smithfield/Blackstone/Woonsocket edition ($2) North Providence edition ($2) ACROSS 1. Got paid 7. Sets free 13. Domestic hybrid cattle 14. Quality of one's character 16. Doctor's helper 17. Not holding back 19. Type of degree 20. Short but severe 22. 007's creator 23. Linguistics icon 25. Large integers 26. Upset 28. Former 29. Peyton's younger brother 30. An Irish dance 31. Title of respect 33. Small lump 34. Baroque musical instrument 36. The third sign of the zodiac 38. The 1st letter of the Hebrew alphabet 40. A group of nine 41. Garment 43. Capital of Yemen 44. One point south of due east 45. Drain 47. Moved quickly 48. Bar bill 51. An idiot 53. Indicates silence 55. Protein-rich liquids 56. Samoan mone- tary units 58. "__ your i's, cross your t's" 59. Forms the bottom 60. Potato state 61. Toy that spins around 64. Barium 65. Type of molding 67. Closes again 69. Sounds the same 70. Come into view DOWN 1. Nix 2. Indicates position 3. Quantitative facts 4. Strong and healthy 5. Former measure of length 6. Dads tend to be this 7. Parts of a movie 8. An animal's foot 9. Expression of sorrow or pity 10. Saudi Arabian money 11. One billion giga- bytes 12. Smallest musical interval 13. A rugged box (usually made of wood) 15. Cheese dish 18. An ugly, evil-looking old woman 21. Widely used 24. Makes into pages 26. Afflict in mind or body 27. Set up 30. Toilets 32. "Life of Jesus" theologian 35. A big deal on Wall St. 37. Western Thai people 38. Free from con- tamination 39. Type of dog 42. Revolver 43. High schoolers' exam 46. San Diego ball- players 47. Hit the sack 49. Suitable for crops 50. Red mineral 52. Yellowish-brown 54. Lowest point be- tween two peaks 55. Late TNT broad- caster 57. Thin strip to align parts 59. Swiss wind 62. A way to chill 63. Jewel 66. Rhodium 68. The top lawyer in the land Answers to this week's crossword puzzle can be found on page 6.

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